Living a Zoo Dream – Ring-tailed Lemurs

We’ve been in full planning mode for Easter at the Lake Superior Zoo.

Our Easter Egg-stravaganza is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, complete with an egg hunt, and then we’ll host a family brunch on Easter Sunday. Staff members have been hard-boiling eggs, collecting prizes and reviewing coloring contest sheets sent in by kids. It should be a fun and exciting weekend for all.

More information about both events can be found at LSZooDuluth.org and on our Facebook page.

Also, as spring continues to show its face in Minnesota (we’ll ignore the small snow we got earlier this week), I have started to explore and enjoy the many wonders of West Duluth. While most tourists know about Canal Park, the Aerial Lift Bridge and Park Point, many miss out on the great experiences in West Duluth. There are miles of hiking and biking trails, great kayaking and fishing on the St. Louis River and some of the best restaurants in town.

Last week, I took a hike up to Ely’s Peak in West Duluth. This is a beautiful hike through birch trees and up a rocky crag stereotypical for northern Minnesota. At the top, one is provided with amazing views of West Duluth and the St. Louis River. The hike is short but semi-strenuous, and the summit is a great place for a picnic lunch, photographs or a quiet setting to think.

In addition to the beautiful rocks, there is an old railroad tunnel that you can walk through. It is long enough to be dark in the middle, but not so long that it’s scary. Also, you are likely to find climbers here practicing their skills on the rocky walls within the tunnel. It is truly a hidden gem in our area. Make sure to look up directions before you go so you can find it, but it is well worth the time and effort.

My animal highlight this week is our ring-tailed lemurs. If you watch kid’s movies, you’ll know that while there are more than 100 varieties of lemurs, they are all found in one location, Madagascar. At the zoo, we have a troop of nine lemurs (seven females and two males), ranging in age from 2 to 22. Each one has his or her own personality and quirks. There are pictures of each lemur with each one’s name at the exhibit. Next time you are out, see if you can identify each lemur. One interesting fact about lemurs is that females rule the roost (the zoo has so many parallels to my home life). In our troop, Rowan and Sorcha are the dominant females, and you can often see them directing the rest of the group.

I wish everyone a great week and a happy Easter weekend. If you get some time, come out the zoo and enjoy our activities. Otherwise, take some time to spend with family and keep your eye out for the Easter Bunny.

Corey Leet is CEO of the Lake Superior Zoo. You can contact him at cleet@lszoo.org or 218-730-4500, extension 203. Find his blog at lszooduluth.org and on the Lake Superior Zoo’s Facebook and Twitter profiles.


No Replies to "Living a Zoo Dream - Ring-tailed Lemurs"